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10 Small Trees That Make A Big Impact In The Backyard

Posted by Alan Bernau Jr on Wed, Aug 7, 2019

small-trees-for-your-backyard

Do you want to add privacy to the area where you relax in your garden? Maybe you have a small backyard that could use a few well-chosen trees to make it more inviting. Small trees can be colorful and the perfect size for a patio, garden, or small backyard. Take a look at ten dwarf trees that can instantly beautify your property, then consider adding one of these small wonders to your yard!

  1. Hibiscus Syriacus: The Hibiscus syriacus, aka the rose of Sharon, is drought-tolerant and features pink flowers with a red center. This small tree can grow to be 12 feet high and 10 feet wide, so it's smart to plant it in an area where it has plenty of space to spread. It blooms from June to October and fares best in growing zones 5 to 8.
  2. Viridis Japanese Maple: In the springtime, this tree features light green leaves that turn red and gold in the autumn. It can grow to be 6 feet tall and 10 feet wide. The Viridis Japanese maple does well in partial shade, making it perfect for planting beneath a larger tree in your landscape. It grows best in zones 5 to 8 and is sensitive to extreme heat.
  3. Pygmy Date Palm: If you live somewhere within zones 9 to 11, this attractive palm tree would be a great addition to your landscape. If you want to plant it near your house to admire its feathery green fronds, be sure to leave about four or five feet of space so it can spread out. This low-maintenance, disease-resistant tree can grow to be 12 feet tall.
  4. Prairifire Flowering Crabapple: This beautiful tree grows up to 20 feet tall and has small purple fruit that can feed your neighborhood birds in the wintertime. It's disease-resistant and grows best in zones 3 through 8. Plant your Prairifire flowering crabapple away from your home so it has plenty of sunlight and open space. Its dark pink flowers bloom in April or May.
  5. Royal Star Magnolia: A royal star magnolia tree has fragrant white flowers that bloom from late February into April. This tree grows best in zones 4 to 9 and can reach a height of 15 feet. Imagine this elegant tree as the centerpiece of your garden: I can't think of a more beautiful sight to admire from your gazebo.
  6. Venus Dogwood Tree: Consider the beauty of a Venus dogwood tree for your yard. Its bright white bracts grow in the springtime, and its foliage turns to red in the autumn. This tree does best in zones 5 to 9 and can grow 20 feet high.
  7. Black Diamond Crepe Myrtle: Are you looking for some small trees to line your fence? If so, the black diamond crepe myrtle is a good bet! These trees grow to be around 10 feet tall with a spread of 4 to 5 feet. This tree, with its collection of deep red flowers, does well in the full sunlight. It blooms through the summer into fall and flourishes in zones 7 to 9.
  8. Camellia Japonica: An evergreen tree perfect for smaller yards, it grows to be just 12 feet tall and 10 feet wide. If you live somewhere in growing zones 7 to 9, then this tree would do well for you. You can admire its reddish pink blooms from late winter into spring.
  9. Ribbon Leaf Japanese Maple: The foliage of this unique tree goes from a bright red in the spring to bronze in the summer to a blazing orange in the autumn. This maple grows to 12 feet tall and 12 feet wide. Plant this tree in growing zones 5 to 9 and it will flourish. Also, make sure you put it in an area with little or no shade. Its size makes it a lovely addition to a smaller yard.
  10. Dwarf Alberta Spruce: Why not have a beautiful spruce in your yard to admire in the winter? This tree grows to a height of 12 feet, so it stays fairly compact. It grows best in zones 3 to 6 and needs full sunlight. This low-maintenance tree with deep green needles is deer-tolerant and is fairly disease-resistant.

I hope you consider one of these beautiful trees for your yard or garden. Thanks for reading. - Alan

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